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Notes and observations from around Pennsylvania
from Commission Waterways Conservation Officers
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Humility
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While stocking Lake Wilma early this past season I was given a rare opportunity to learn about humility from our stocking helpers and driver. I will let them remain anonymous so I don’t give them the satisfaction of knowing they got one over on me.

It was a particularly hot day and I was tired already from carrying buckets on Whiteley Creek. Luckily for me Lake Wilma is easily stocked by tubing the trout into the main Lake body. The only work required is carrying the rigid hoses from one side of the truck to the other. EASY.

Well this day our truck seemed to be a little short on the rigid hose so we had to attach the soft flexible blue hose on the end to make it to the water. Again, EASY.

Well, we shot 2 tanks in and I had presumed that we were empty. Here’s where the humility comes into play. I began to shake the rigid tubes to force any straggler trout out, and then sort of squeezed out the last few trout in the soft hose. I then rolled the soft blue hose all the way up and began to disconnect the fittings of all the hoses.

Thinking that was the last tank and not keeping a very good count on the day taught me one thing. Your helpers and driver will let you work and sweat and get all the way done with rolling and disconnecting rigid lines before asking what you’re doing. WE HAD 2 TANKS LEFT!!!

Thanks you two for the lesson and the welcome back to trout season.

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— WCO Eric Davis, Greene / S. Washington Counties
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Man’s BEST Friend???
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Last summer, DWCO Wetsell and I were on boat patrol at Canadohta Lake. We observed a small pontoon boat less than 20 feet in length being operated with someone on the bow outside the passenger carrying area. Upon closer look the person on the bow was a child less than 12 years old not wearing a personal floatation device (PFD).

We stopped the boat and advised the operator of the violations:
1–A child 12 years old or less on a boat 20 feet or less not wearing a PFD while underway.
2–A person riding outside the passenger carrying area on a pontoon boat.

The operator advised us that he didn’t realize the child was outside the passenger carrying area and that the child only had the PFD off for a short time because it was so “hot.”

While the violations were being addressed, there was a cute little dog that kept darting around on the pontoon boat. An interesting observation we had was that even though it was so ”hot” the cute little dog that was running all over the boat had to keep it’s PFD on the whole time. Additionally, it wasn’t allowed outside the passenger carrying area so it wouldn’t fall off.

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— WCO Terry Crecraft, Eastern Crawford County/SW Warren County
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Get Back to Work
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Opening day of trout season was busy this year in Butler County.  The weather was cooperative and the anglers were hungry for some excitement following a long, bitterly cold winter.

Harbor Acres Lake was packed with anglers.  It took me two hours to check the nearly 500 anglers who surrounded the lake. Just as I was leaving, a precocious young angler - maybe 12 years old, four foot tall, wearing black rimmed cat’s eye glasses, with tackle box in one hand and fishing pole in the other - stopped me for a conversation. His Dad proudly noted that it was his son’s first year of fishing.

This young man began asking me a series of questions and making statements with rapid fire precision. He was so excited and spoke so quickly he didn’t allow me any time to respond: “I like to fish.” “How many fish are in this lake?” “I can cast really far with this pole.” “Are there any sharks here?” He stopped just long enough for me to answer his shark question. I replied, “There are no sharks in here. Sharks live in the oceans.” He paused for a second, reflecting on my answer.

As quickly as the questions were asked, they ended. He turned towards the lake and as he walked away he said, “Ok, you can go back to work now.”

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— WCO Jonathan Kay, Butler County
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Perspective
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While patrolling a popular swimming area on one of my favorite streams, I observed several swimmers jumping from rocks into the cool waters of a deep hole. This particular section of stream is notorious for littering, so I remained hidden and watched to see if any members of this group were going to add their empty cans to the already large number scattered on the ground near the stream.

At first, all seemed well and this group momentarily restored my faith in humanity because they were putting all their empty cans into a garbage bag. I was just about to move on when I noticed that one of the guys walked over and picked up a can that had been discarded earlier by some other group. Unfortunately, instead of putting the can into the garbage bag, he threw it into the water. He then picked up 18 other cans and threw each of them into the water where they eventually settled to the stream bottom.

As you may imagine I was quite eager to introduce myself to this individual but was a little shocked by his perspective of what had occurred. According to this guy, he has no tolerance for litter and as a result had to get rid of all those empty cans lying around on the ground.

When I asked him why he threw them in the stream instead of putting them into the garbage bag that he and his group had been using, he stated that they were not his cans and therefore not his responsibility. I explained to him that according to the law once he touched them they became his responsibility. He disagreed, but fortunately the judge agreed with me and found him guilty.

I’m just glad that this guy had no tolerance for littering otherwise who knows how much stuff would have ended up in the stream instead of just 19 cans.

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— WCO Scott Opfer, Northern Wayne County
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Picture This
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DWCO Ney and I were on boat patrol, on the Susquehanna River, when we noticed something amiss. As we approached the individual’s watercraft we began a standard boat boarding; checking license, creel, and boating safety equipment.

During the check, one of the fishermen handed me his phone. Momentarily confused I asked a second time, for his fishing license? He said, “Isn’t it there?” His voice was brimming with confidence as he motioned and pointed to the screen of his phone.

Sure enough on the phone was a picture of his license. The man continued to explain he purchased the license online, the night before, however ran out of printer paper. So he quickly snapped a picture of the license on the computer screen.

I explained I would give him the opportunity to prove the license was valid. The man did as I requested and I received the license several days later.

Perhaps a just penalty for not having his license, while fishing, we should have requested he display his phone on his fishing vest.

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— WCO Mark A. Sweppenhiser, N. Dauphin/Lower Northumberland Counties
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Isn't That A Daisy
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In each district there is at least one spot which continually draws the wrong crowd; a place where no amount of policing ever seems to dent the thick-headed attitude of those who abuse rather than use. One of ours was located adjacent to both an outdated rail line and isolated approved trout water. Since long before my time, I mean on earth not just on the job, this spot drew the crème de la crème of vagabonds and riff-raff.

So, naturally, when I returned home, we decided it was time to do some housecleaning. For years, wrongdoings came with the ease of picking daisies. We hit the trouble spots without regard to day of week, and they didn’t know if we’d show up at noon, midnight, or both. Sure, there was an ebb and flow; but, despite the constant collecting, our flowers always returned.

Then we began to notice that families rather than felons were who we were talking to— in the daytime at first; then at night, too. Signage that we placed remained, rather than being used as tinder for their fires. The ground around the tents was being cleaned and raked, rather than littered with cans and party remnants. Placed outside those tents, we began to find tricycles and sand toys, rather than kegs and spent casings.

To be sure, voluntary compliance is the goal of my job; however, I still have to work 40 hours a week. When this hot-spot, as well as numerous others within the district, began to dry-up, patrols took on all the tangible charm of finding Bigfoot.

So, we changed-up our tactics; perhaps we weren’t as unpredictable as we thought. Simply, they had adjusted to us. Weeks came and went with little change, then months; yet we kept shaking things up and turning them upside down.

Very early one Sunday morning we walked in to have a listen, and we clearly heard music as we stood beside the old grade. Like a hundred times before, our wayward travelers had simply passed out after a hard night and left the radio playing. Entering the flats where the tents could always be found, we discovered nothing. Yet, the music kept on. Beside the creek, that’s where they were! Onward we went.

Then it happened… we reached the creek and, sure enough, there they were— a local church group, joyfully conducting a sunrise service and performing baptisms. The music was an acoustic guitar being used to assist with the selected hymns. We conducted introductions, wished them good tidings, then politely excused ourselves; for, obviously, at this point, I felt as though my cynicism knew no bounds!! With ministers now replacing miscreants, it appears, at least for the near future, that we’ve reached the end of the line for this bygone Babylon.

However, time has taught that crime really isn’t stopped, just moved. Rule to live by #11 tells me to carry on and continue to turn over rocks… but, those rules are another story for another time.

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— WCO Mark T. Kerr, Venango County
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A Snake to be Feared
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This February has been one of the coldest on record so when I received a call from Captain Bednarchik about a woman who found a rattlesnake in her house I was surprised. The woman reported that she had put the snake into a plastic shopping bag and put it on top of her garbage cans outside of her house.

My husband, WCO Jerry Czech of the PA Game Commission was riding with me that day. When I relayed the reported information to him he replied “That’s why I’m a Game Warden and not a Fish Warden.” He has an unrealistic fear of snakes.

Upon arrival at the address, we found a small Wawa shopping bag tied at the top sitting on top of the garbage cans. I retrieved the bag and immediately knew that it was NOT a rattlesnake (not that I had much suspicion it would be). The small pencil size snake was stiff and coiled in the bag but the tail was apparent through the semi-opaque bag.

I placed the bag on WCO Jerry Czech’s lap and he looked at me like I had four heads. I said “Relax, it’s not a rattlesnake and it’s frozen.”

After checking on a pollution in the area we headed back to our headquarters. We carried all of our equipment and supplies into the house and I put the bag with the snake on the kitchen island. I put my briefcase away and went to open the bag to identify the type of snake.

Jerry happened to be behind me when I opened the bag and low and behold the little garter snake poked his head out of the bag. Jerry screamed and jumped back about 10 feet yelling “it was alive on my lap.” After I finished laughing, the snake was put into a small cage for release in the spring.

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— WCO Erin Czech, East Philadelphia County
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Needle In A Haystack
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The protection and management of our native reptiles and amphibians is the responsibility of the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC).  It is because of this that a timber rattlesnake population study and den assessment inventory was begun in 2003.  As an officer, and team member, I have had the opportunity to participate in countless assessments, and details, across the commonwealth.

After ten years and two districts, in 2005, I was able to transfer to my home county of Venango; where for the first 24 years of my life, which included thousands of hours in the woods, I never knowingly came across any of these creatures.  However, Venango is one of a handful of Pennsylvania counties which supports all three species of native venomous snakes (eastern timber rattlesnake, eastern massasauga, and northern copperhead).

Immediately, I took up the challenge of attempting to confirm/assess Venango’s resident rattlesnake population; an undertaking made all the more difficult since:

  1. all our known information on local sites was both outdated and/or rumor,
  2. their annual coming out overlaps with trout stocking, trout season, and the start of the summer boating season, and
  3. snake hunters are not known to be Chatty-Cathy’s.

Nevertheless, in 2006, as I was traveling the windings of an illegal ATV trail, there they were; two coiled atop a weathered stump.  Over the course of the next eight years, we located more rattlesnakes, including young, in the immediate area around the stump.  We knew a den had to be close; however, despite countless searches, we weren’t able to locate it.  In the spring of 2014, Sergeant Tarkowski and I had another opportunity to return.  We saw only one snake, but weather conditions were poor.  Given the snake’s location, we were able to conclude that a waypoint, marked into the GPS on Valentine’s Day 2013, was very likely a den entrance.

Captain Nestor, Sergeant Tarkowski, and I returned shortly thereafter; weather conditions were much improved.  Upon reaching the promising coordinate, we were greeted with numerous timber rattlesnakes basking around those holes which had prompted the waypoint entry.  For the first time, as known to us, the PFBC had documented a timber rattlesnake den site within Venango County.

On its face, to many, the achievement may not seem newsworthy; however, for us it was the culmination of eight years of trial and error, as well as frustration and, finally, validation.
Since 2005, we have located several other basking populations of rattlesnakes within the county.  The site discussed here is still the only den entrance we’ve verified.  Obviously, we still have miles to go before we rest.  However, the lessons learned will pave the way for new discoveries in 2015 and beyond.

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— WCO Mark T. Kerr, Venango County
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Safe Hockey
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While patrolling Shawnee Lake in February looking for ice fisherman, I noticed a vehicle parked in the Colvin Lot. As I parked, I saw an adult male wearing ice skates and pushing a puck around the ice with a hockey stick. This activity is not uncommon on the lake, but much to my surprise, the hockey player was actually wearing al life jacket! I was impressed with this his way of thinking by putting safety first while engaging in this activity.

Everyone who ventures out on the ice, whether it be for ice fishing, skating, walking, etc… should wear a USCG approved PFD, along with a pair of ice awls/spikes. Ice conditions can be so variable; it pays to put safety first. Check out the Pa Fish and Boat Commissions website for additional information on ice safety.

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— WCO Ted Kane, Bedford / W. Fulton Counties
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Trading Down
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One afternoon DWCO Ammon and I pulled our patrol boat to the shoreline. While eating lunch we noticed a canoe making its way across the river towards us. DWCO Ammon made the comment, “I bet they don’t have life jackets.”

We continued to eat our lunch as they pulled in alongside us. Looking inside the canoe we noticed that in fact they didn’t have any life jackets onboard. But that’s not the best part of the story. It turns out that these guys happened upon this canoe and decided they were going to take it for a joyride without the owner’s permission.

I still find it comical that this duo decided to steal a canoe and then pull up to law enforcement officers just to shoot the breeze. They left without the canoe but picked up a court date for their actions.

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— WCO Jeremiah Allen, Beaver County
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Painting without a license
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On a sunny winter morning I was watching a popular ice fishing lake in Susquehanna County. On this particular morning it wasn’t very popular so I decided to wait. I got busy shuffling papers and such in my patrol vehicle when I realized somebody had not only showed up but was out on the lake.

I grabbed my binoculars and looked for a displayed license. There was none. I sat there watching a man walk back and forth looking at stumps and bushes. He had a sled full of what I assumed was fishing gear, but didn’t have any tip-ups out or even an auger that I could see.

Then it occurred to me that perhaps he was trapping. I continued to watch him and decided to move my truck into a better vantage point. He went back to his sled and grabbed what I thought were wooden tip-ups.

To my surprise, he unfolded a wooden easel for painting. I’ve been called all sorts of variations of “fun police”, but on this day I decided that “paint police” was not going to be one of them. So I continued on with my day.

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— WCO Chad McKenrick, N. Susquehanna / E. Bradford Counties
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First Ice Angler of the Year
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Every winter the avid hard water anglers wait in anticipation for the first safe ice to venture out and try their luck. This winter the ice just formed and I was pondering how thick the ice had become when I noticed a mature bald eagle out on the ice.

A look through my spotting scope revealed that it wasn’t fish on the menu, but an unlucky duck. A few days later the human anglers started to appear.

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— WCO Patrick W. Ferko, Somerset County
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Annual Advice
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As the trout stocking season fast approaches, I look forward to seeing some of the volunteers who assist the PFBC with this endeavor.  I am particularly interested in hearing the advice offered to the agency and me.

Two individuals that never miss a stocking are Yuotta and his friend Yushooda.  Yuotta generally has advice for the agency, while Yushooda usually provides me with specific advice.

Yuotta always states that you (the PFBC),  otta stock bigger trout, you (the PFBC) otta stock more trout and you (the PFBC) otta stock other waters not on the stocking list.

Yushooda usually provides specific advice such as: you shooda stocked more trout in that hole, or you shooda float stocked or you shooda got more people to help stock, or you shooda spread the fish out better, or you shooda put more fish where people could get to them easier.

As always, I take all of this advice with a grain of salt.  In return for this valuable input I tell them you otta contact the agency and you shooda carried some buckets today.

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— WCO Albert Colian, Cambria County
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