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Green Lick Lake
Fayette County
 
Spring Surveys

Green Lick Lake (Fayette County) is a 101-acre lake owned by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission. Located east of Woodale, this lake is sometimes also known as Jacobs Creek Reservoir. Green Lick has been stocked with walleye and channel catfish in past years to increase angling opportunities. The lake is a mildly turbid lake with moderate productivity (alkalinity 20 parts per million). The lake has a variety of habitats ranging from vegetated near shore zones to rock ledges. The county park surrounding the lake provides a scenic setting.

The main purpose of our 2008 surveys was to determine the size and quality of the lake’s resident gamefish and panfish populations. Walleye were the most numerous gamefish species collected, while crappie and sunfish both were the most numerous panfish collected. Table 1 summarizes the catch data from our April 2008 survey with trap nets.

Table 1. 2008 Survey Gear: 12 Trap Net Sets
Fish Species Number Size Range (inches)

Comments

Walleye 53 7-26  73% greater than 15 inches
Largemouth Bass 3 3-6
Channel Catfish 22 21-27  All quality fish
Bluegill 491 3-10
Pumpkinseed 13 3-5
Green Sunfish 1 Not measured
Black Crappie 447 3-11
White Crappie 59 5-12
Yellow Perch 1,325 4-7
White Sucker 25 Not measured All quality fish
Common Carp 22 Not measured All quality fish
Muskellunge 2 19-21
Bluntnose minnow 2 Not measured
Spotfin Shiner 1 Not measured

Area 8 Fisheries Manager Rick Lorson holding a lunker channel catfish
Area 8 Fisheries Manager Rick Lorson holding a lunker channel catfish measuring in at 27.5 inches and 10 pounds

Bluegills were a very abundant fish collected in the nets. The Bluegill population has increased since the last survey and not surprisingly so has the larger quality fish (i.e. greater than 7 inches). The state panfish enhancement guideline is 0.51 quality fish per hour, and during our sampling in 2008 we collected quality fish at a rate of 0.81 per hour.

Figure 1

Area 8 Fisheries Biologist Bob Ventorini holding a couple of nice bluegill
Area 8 Fisheries Biologist Bob Ventorini holding a couple of nice bluegill

Crappies were also abundant in assessment catch; although quality size (over 9 inches) numbers dropped since the last survey in 1997. The temperature of the lake was low at the time of the survey and may have played a role on the activity of the fish and assessment catch. The number of quality fish collected per hour was 0.39 and exceeds the state panfish enhancement guideline of 0.25 fish per hour.

Figure 2

Area 8 Fisheries Biologist Aide Joe Cocco holding a couple of nice white crappie
Area 8 Fisheries Biologist Aide Joe Cocco holding a couple of nice white crappie

Area 8 Fisheries Biologist Bob Ventorini holding a couple of very nice black crappie
Area 8 Fisheries Biologist Bob Ventorini holding a couple of very nice black crappie

Total walleye collected increased slightly since the last sampling period in 1997, and the number of quality fish (over 15 inches) collected has doubled. The number of quality fish collected per hour was 0.14 and the state walleye guideline is 0.15 fish per hour.

Figure 3

Area 8 Fish management Supervisor Rick Lorson holding a large walleye
Area 8 Fish management Supervisor Rick Lorson holding a large walleye

During the nighttime electrofishing survey we found that the number and sizes of largemouth bass have increased to exceed the guidelines for Big Bass lakes, although this lake is not in that program. Largemouth bass assessment catch nearly doubled since the last assessment. In 2008 83% were greater than 12 inches and 53% were greater than 15 inches in our assessment catch. Table 2 below summarizes the catch data from our 2008 electrofishing survey.

Area 8 Fish Management Supervisor Rick Lorson holding a very nice largemouth bass
Area 8 Fish Management Supervisor Rick Lorson holding a very nice largemouth bass

Sampling tub full of quality size largemouth bass from nighttime electrofishing
Sampling tub full of quality size largemouth bass from nighttime electrofishing

To provide added perspective about largemouth bass at Green Lick, abundance indices have been improving with each survey since 1979. The abundance of bass from 1979 to 2008 has nearly tripled in terms of fish collected per hour. The percent of quality fish to total number of fish has increased as well. All state big bass guidelines are exceeded at Green Lick Lake with bass over 12 inches collected at a rate of 37 per hour (state guideline 7 per hour) and bass over 15 inches collected at a rate of 24 per hour (state guideline 2 per hour).

Figure 4

We conclude by saying that Green Lick Lake provides a great place to fish for many species including walleye, largemouth bass, channel catfish, bluegill, crappie, suckers, and common carp.

 
-- Joe Cocco, Fisheries Biologist Aide, and Rick Lorson, Area 8 Fisheries Manager

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